February 6, 2024 | Blog

Danger Ahead: When Your Partner Says, ‘It’s Okay to Skip Valentine’s Day,” Many Don’t Mean It

graduates throwing graduation caps in the air

Valentine’s Day is nearly upon us and for many coupled Americans the pressure is on. But “What should we do?” turns out to be a loaded question.

While nearly half (48%) have told a significant other they didn’t need to do anything for Valentine’s Day, as it turns out about a quarter (23%) of them didn’t mean it and were disappointed when there was nothing to mark the occasion, according to a Wakefield Research survey of 2,000 Americans 18 years and older.

Men in relationships with women need to be extra alert to this nuance, as women (53%) are more likely to tell their partner they don’t need to do anything for Valentine’s Day, and then be disappointed when it’s a day like any other (27%, compared to 18% of men).

Many Americans think it’s fine to give the hearts and flowers a rest. Two in 5 (40%) believe it’s okay to skip Valentine’s Day after a certain point in a relationship, and nearly a quarter (24%) feel it’s fine to skip celebrating it within the first 5 years. Millennials are the most likely to say it’s okay to skip Valentine’s Day (55%), compared to Gen Z (47%), Gen X (40%) and Boomers (25%).

Skipping Valentine’s Day doesn’t mean simply foregoing the Hallmark-fueled romantic plans that often define it. For nearly a quarter (24%) they would actually prefer to spend that day in pajamas and watching a movie on the couch by themselves than spending alone time with their partner, including 18% of those who are married or in a relationship. Cozy! 

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